Video: Logan’s Law legislation withdrawn

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Proposed legislation to protect people from “potentially dangerous animals” has been withdrawn by State Representative Keisha Waites.

 On March 3, Waites decided to withdraw her proposed House Bill 313, otherwise known as “Logan’s Law.”

 HB 313 proposed that the Department of Public Health provide information to customers looking to purchase or adopt a certain breed of dog, including the reported number of humans bitten by dogs, the total medical costs related to injuries caused by dogs in the United States and the total amount of damages awarded to victims of dog bites or dog attacks in the United States.

 Waites, who represents portions of Atlanta and a portion of DeKalb County, proposed the legislation after a six-year-old boy was killed in a dog attack in January.

 

 

 The boy, Logan Braatz was on the way to school when he and two other students were attacked by three dogs.

“I am an avid animal lover and proud dog owner, and my pet Chow Chow Sandi is a beloved family member. However, I understand that as a responsible pet owner, I must take the necessary precautions to ensure Sandi does not bite or injure others,” Waites said in a statement after withdrawing HB 313. “Unfortunately, my community has suffered several tragedies as a result of irresponsible dog owners, and we recently lost a little boy, Logan, to a dog violent fatal dog mauling. In the wake of Logan’s death, I introduced a bill that I believed might help in preventing future tragedies, legislation that would simply require dog bite statistics to be distributed upon purchasing or adopting a new pet.”

For more information, check out an upcoming article of the Champion Newspaper and future web post.

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  1. John Hewitt says:

    Discrimination of any kind, in any form, is unacceptable, but our state officials are considering legislation that is discriminatory to its core.

    I’d be willing to bet that Rep. Keisha Waites of House District 60, an openly gay member of the Georgia General Assembly who proposed HB 331, would be among the first to object to discrimination directed toward her, those she cares about or those who contribute to her campaign coffers. Yet, she proposed legislation that imposes restrictions on owners and handlers of dogs that may be considered by some as exhibiting “violent or aggressive behavior”.

    Included in HB 331’s proposed list of breeds deemed to be potentially “violent and aggressive” are “a canine that is entirely or partly of the American pit bull terrier, American Staffordshire terrier, American bully, Staffordshire bull terrier, Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler, German shepherd, Chow Chow, Husky, Great Dane, Akita, Boxer or Wolf hybrid breed”.

    The above reference of “entirely or partly” is as absurd as the old “one drop rule” that was commonly observed in the early history of our nation. Any person who had, or was assumed to have, one drop of African or Native American blood was considered non-White.

    If we apply this same rationale to humans, the absurdity becomes even more evident. According to the Washington Post and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, from 2004 to 2013, there were 1,051 law enforcement officers killed as a result of a criminal act; the offenders were 52 percent White and 43 percent Black.

    If Waites rationale is applied to humans, would legislation be needed to inform any person who interacts with a White person that they may be in danger. Of course, not.

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